Hey everyone in the wingfoiling world! I’ve been scouting out some cool places for our next adventures and wanted to share a few spots I’ve come across in Europe. They range from serene to challenging, so there’s a little something for every taste.

Here’s a quick rundown of the places for wingfoiling in Europe:

  • Lefkada, Greece: It’s got three unique spots, each with a different character: Agios Nikolaos, Vasiliki, and Milos Beach. Definitely worth exploring.
  • Sardinia, Italy: Check out Porto Pollo and Stintino. Known for their beautiful landscapes and the kind of winds that keep things interesting.
  • Leucate, France: This place, with La Franqui and Ètange de La Palme, offers reliable winds and a variety of conditions, perfect for mixing things up.
  • Lake Garda, Italy: Not only is it stunningly beautiful, but it also has some of the most consistent winds you’ll find in Italy.
  • Tarifa, Spain: A must-visit for those who love a good challenge. It’s known as Europe’s wind capital for good reason.
  • Viana do Castelo, Portugal: A bit quieter but equally charming with some decent wind conditions.
  • Zeeland, Holland: This is an emerging spot that’s starting to gain more attention among the wingfoiling community.

I’ll get into more specifics about each spot soon, so you know exactly what to expect. Hope this helps in planning your next wingfoiling session!

Wingfoiling in Lefkada, Greece

Embarking on a wingfoiling adventure across the breathtaking island of Lefkada in Greece, I discovered three remarkable spots that are a must-visit for any enthusiast. Each location, Agios Nikolaos, Vasiliki, and Milos Beach, offers unique challenges and experiences, making Lefkada a diverse and exciting destination for wingfoilers.

Some of the main features of Lefkada as wing foil hot spot are:

  • Thermal Hotspot: Lefkada is known for its excellent thermal wind conditions
  • Diverse Wind Directions: The dominant winds are from the north-northwest and west to northwest.
  • Suitable for All Levels: The spots cater to everyone from beginners to pros, with different areas suitable for varying skill levels.
  • Variety of Spots: Lefkada offers a range of wingfoiling locations including Vasiliki, Milos Beach, and Agios Nikolaos, each with its unique characteristics.
  • Equipment and Schools: Numerous schools along the beaches, with available gear, make it easy for enthusiasts to get into the water quickly.
  • Seasonal Wind Yield: Best wind conditions occur during the summer months
  • Long Wind Hours: Winds typically pick up around 2 pm and last well into the night
  • Weather and Water Conditions: Warm Greek weather allows for comfortable wingfoiling

Vasiliki

image of vasiliki beach in greece with foilers in the water

Vasiliki is a thermal hotspot and a dream destination for wingfoilers. The wingfoiling scene here is great! Schools line up along the beach like pearls on a string, and the gear is conveniently stored right at the beachfront, ready to hit the water as soon as the wind picks up. 

The geographic layout with surrounding mountains and summer thermals creates a mind-blowing falling wind in the bay, making it a paradise for wingfoilers.

The dominant wind direction is north-northwest, and the wind yield is statistically amazing, though it’s mostly a summer gig, limited to about 5 months. Outside of this window, it’s hit or miss. 

The spot caters to all skill levels – beginners enjoy the calmer mornings, while the afternoons and evenings see intermediates and pros zipping through the shallow waters. During off-season the bay even gets some mid-sized waves.

The closer to shore, the weaker the wind gets. But no worries, with the sunny and warm Greek weather, a shorty wetsuit is all you need. 

Milos Beach (Agios Ioannis)

drone image of milos beach - agios ioannis - wing foiling spot with some surfers in the background

This place is a real thermal hotspot, perfect for wingfoiling, especially in June when the wind conditions are just right.

Milos Beach, also known as Agios Ioannis, is situated in the north of Lefkada and it’s one of three super spots in close proximity. The prevailing summer winds here are thermal, blowing from the west to northwest starting around 2 pm. It’s the perfect side onshore wind that makes every session enjoyable.

It’s primarily a spot for the surfing community; you won’t find many bathers here. The downside is the boulders along the beach. Navigating over these slippery rocks to reach deeper water is a bit of a challenge, but after about 20 meters, it’s perfect for wingfoiling.

Early June is relatively calm in terms of the crowd and parking, but it gets busier as the main season kicks in. However, the huge water surface means there’s enough space for everyone to enjoy their time on the water.

I’d say Milos Beach isn’t exactly beginner-friendly due to the rocky entry and strong thermal winds. The two other spots – Vasiliki and Agios Nikolaos – are much better suited for newbies.

The wind here starts around 2 pm and blows hard until dark. The wind is steady and makes for a relaxed ride, but if you’re into waves, you might find it a bit lacking unless there’s been a big storm.

Agios Nikolaos

birds eye view of agios nikolaos wing foil spot in lefkada greece

This spot is a thermal paradise, especially in June when the winds really pick up.

Lefkada is a haven for water sports, with a variety of spots to choose from. In the north of the island, there are three incredible spots, but Agios Nikolaos stole my heart. It’s a bit off the beaten path, located on the mainland, and it’s got everything a wingfoiler could dream of.

The wind at Agios Nikolaos starts picking up around 2 pm, blowing in a thermal west to northwest direction. The side onshore winds are perfect for a smooth ride. The lagoon is a bit shallow, and not super suitable for wingfoilers, but the rest of the area is open for all kinds of wingfoiling.

The spot might feel a bit isolated, but there’s a fantastic beach bar nearby. The view from the beach includes the bar, school, parking area, and a lovely stretch of sand. 

The sandy beach is perfect for all levels, especially beginners, with its gently sloping shore and ample standing area. In early June, the beach is relatively quiet, but it gets much busier in the main season.

The wind is steady and strong, lasting well into the night. It’s steady and easy to ride, coming in straight from the sea.

Wave lovers might find it a bit calm here, as the shore break only really comes in after big storms. 

I noticed Agios usually has a few knots less wind than Milos Beach, which is just 12km away. When the wind comes from the north, there’s a nice shorebreak.

Wingfoiling in Sardinia, Italy

Sardinia’s wind patterns are pretty unique, often changing quickly, which can be both challenging and exciting. The spots here are suitable for both advanced and beginner riders. If you’re heading to Sardinia for wingfoiling, you’re in for a treat. 

On the island the main wingfoiling spots are:

Porto Pollo

This place is a wind sports paradise with separate zones for different activities, so everyone’s got their space. The winds here are incredible, with strong Mistral and Poniente in spring and midsummer, and Lavante later in the year. The water is just perfect for foiling – obstacle-free with a gentle slope. And the infrastructure? Top-notch with a campsite, beach bars, and schools. Just a heads up, parking can get pricey in high season. But the wingfoiling experience here, especially for beginners like me, is just fantastic.

Is Solinas

is solins top view of the wing foil spot in sardinia italy

Is Solinas in southwest Sardinia. If Punta Trettu’s too crowded for you, this is the place to be. The bay’s huge, and the water depth suits all kinds of wind sports. Though Porto Botte is more for kitesurfing, Is Solinas itself is great for wingfoiling. The predominant winds are Mistral and Sirocco, but you might catch the south wind Libeccio too. There aren’t any campsites right there, but the camper parking lot in the bay is quite handy. The beach offers a good 100 meters of shallow water, ideal for beginners and freestyle lovers.

Porto Pino

porto pino's long beach for wing foiling

Then, there’s Porto Pino, a dream spot with a long beach and some nice touristy amenities. It’s not as isolated, and the white sandy beach is just superb. It’s especially great outside peak season when you can have vast stretches of water to yourself. The prevalent winds here include Mistral and Sirocco, and the Tramontana in winter. Porto Pino is suitable for all skill levels, and the wind can pick up an extra 8 to 10 knots a bit offshore.

La Caletta

la calleta in sardinia italy is e perfect spot for wingfoilers

Finally, I checked out La Caletta on the East Coast. If you find San Teodoro too packed or the winds too light, La Caletta’s your spot. It offers additional thermal wind, making it perfect for wingfoiling. The double bay, including Prosara, provides similar conditions. Parking near the beach is a bit expensive, but it’s worth it for the access to these great spots. La Caletta is excellent for wingfoiling, especially for beginners, with ample space and gentle conditions.

Wingfoiling in Leucate, France

la franqui wing foil spot in leucate france
La Franqui

If you’re into challenging wing foiling with strong winds and aren’t daunted by the prospect of intense sessions, then Leucate is your spot. The term “hack wind” must’ve been coined here, with Trami gusts hitting from 15 to a whopping 35 knots. No wonder Leucate’s so popular among the foiling community!

Right north of Leucate, there are two spots: La Franqui on the coast and La Palme – the lagoon . The lagoon, spanning about 3km long and 800 meters wide, is not suitable for too wingfoiling because of its shallow waters – 50 – 80 cm. .

On the other hand La Franqui has about a 5 km long beach stretch, where different water sports disciplines share the space. Kitesurfers, for instance, are only allowed in the middle part near the kite school during the high season.

The wingfoiling experience here is excellent. The wide sandy beach is perfect, although the water becomes mirror-smooth in Tramontana conditions, making it a high-speed playground.

For beginners, the gently sloping sandy beach is great

In terms of temperatures, you’re on the warmer side of the Mediterranean here. You can wear a shorty wetsuit throughout the long summer. Since the Tramontana mostly blows in winter, you can expect softer Marin winds or thermal winds in summer.

Wingfoiling at Lake Garda, Italy

wingfoil competition in lake garda italy

Lake Garda, especially the northern shore, is a hot spot for wingfoiling. It’s not just the winds; it’s the whole Italian vibe that makes it special.

Different Areas of Lake Garda

So, Lake Garda is pretty diverse. The south part is chill, great for sailing or SUP. But the real action starts from Brenzone upwards. Here the mountains squeeze the wind, making places like Navene perfect for all kinds of wind sports. Malcesine gets the best of the morning north wind, known as Peler or Vento.

Wind Conditions

Talking about winds, there are two main ones to look out for. The Peler blows from the north at night, and from June to September, it can reach up to 20 knots. Then there’s the Ora in the afternoon – stronger towards Torbole and milder in Malcesine. If you’re keen on the nitty-gritty of these winds, check out gardasee.surf for more info.

Wingfoiling Conditions

The spot’s perfect for all levels. Even with the lake’s tricky wind stats, you can usually bet on good conditions.

Tarifa wingfoiling spot, Spain

big wingfoiling day in tarifa spain with a lot of raiders in the water

is the southernmost point in mainland Europe. And wow, what a spot for wingfoiling! It’s sandwiched between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, offering a unique mix of conditions. Here’s my rundown of what makes Tarifa a must-visit for any wingfoiler.

Tarifa is famous for its consistent winds. We’ve got two main wind systems: the Poniente, which is offshore from the right, and the Levante, which is offshore from the left. These varying winds create diverse conditions that are perfect for honing your skills.

In Tarifa, you might get a week or even two of Levante, which means consistent 20-40 knot winds every day.

Tarifa isn’t just about wind; the place itself is fantastic for water sports. With Levante and Poniente being the main wind directions, almost all the spots are on the same long beach stretching from Tarifa to Punta Paloma. Yet, each spot offers slightly different conditions. There are also a few hidden gems on the Mediterranean side and in the next bay on the Atlantic side.

For wingfoiling, Tarifa offers great variety. You can enjoy flat water at Campo de Futbol or seek out choppier waters at Arte Vita. The town also has great beginner spots like Dos Mares, with its sandy beaches and relatively sheltered winds.

When it’s too windy, there are nearby spots like Kilometro Noventa or Wada Messi, offering side-shore winds and smoother conditions. If you’re looking for something lighter, Bologna beach is the spot in summer. It’s a bit quieter and offers slightly lighter winds than Tarifa.

The wind is almost always up in Tarifa. Whether it’s Levante or Poniente, you can count on some great wingfoiling sessions.

wingfoiling, Portugal

Viana do Castelo in Portugal is known for its beautiful wave spots. The heart of the spot is Praia de Cabedelo beach. This spot is incredible for wingfoiling, with its broad stretch of sand and direct beach access.

The wingfoiling playground here is massive. You can sail in the bay or the flat water area inside the harbor entrance, with north to northwest winds often doubling in strength during the summer. 

The beach itself has clearly defined areas for different activities, softening up a bit out of season.

At low tide, the beach is wonderfully wide, perfect for those who prefer less crowded conditions. 

Winfoiling in Zeeland, Netherlands

Zeeland is a haven for water sports, especially wingfoiling. 

Bruinisse Nord

First up, let’s talk about Bruinisse Nord. Tucked away in the province of Zeeland, between Rotterdam and Antwerpen, Bruinisse might not be the biggest name on the map, but it’s a hidden gem for wingfoilers.

What makes Bruinisse Nord unique is its location. It’s about 15 kilometers inland at the end of the Grevelingenmeer, which means it gets about two to three knots less wind than the coastal spots. 

The area is split into a north and south spot by the N59 road, each suitable for different wind directions. The northern spot, where we’re focusing, is on the inside of the Grevelingenmeer and the Grevelingendam.

This spot is divided into two areas: one for windsurfers and one for kitesurfers and foilers. You can enjoy wind directions from west, through north, to northeast. However, it’s good to note that western winds are not as prevalent here as in other coastal spots. 

The great thing about Bruinisse Nord is its massive, long shallow water area after the entry point, making it ideal for beginners and experienced surfers alike. 

However, be aware of the rocky shoreline – a suggestion for improvement could be adding some pebbles at the entry point to make it smoother.

When it comes to water conditions, with the north wind, you might find the surface not as smooth, but that’s part of the adventure, isn’t it?

Bruinisse Nord is also significant for its absence of tide, making it a unique spot in Europe.

Neeltje Jans

Moving on to Neeltje Jans. This artificial island is not just for Delta Park visitors but also a favorite among wing and kitesurfers. What’s cool about this spot is its two-kilometer-long beach bordered by a jetty on the southern end, offering a generous riding area. Ideal for wind directions from southwest to north

The spot is more suited for experienced surfers due to its stone heaps in the south and north and the currents a bit further out.

If you’re into wingfoiling, you’ll love the short standing area and the conditions perfect for wave junkies, especially with southwest wind. Stable, warm summers are rare in the Netherlands, so apart from July and August, the water is quite cold.

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